Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-2017

Subject: LCSH

Columns, Concrete, Concrete-filled tubes

Disciplines

Civil Engineering

Abstract

Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of using fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) wraps, with fibers oriented in the hoop direction, for rehabilitating corrosion-damaged columns. This paper reports findings related to the freeze-thaw durability of concrete specimens with round and square cross sections, wrapped with glass and carbon FRP, after they are subjected to an internal expansive force similar to that generated by corroding steel. The results of the experiment indicate that freeze-thaw cycles have no statistically significant effect on the compressive strength of glass- and carbon-wrapped specimens. Freeze-thaw conditioning generally reduced the longitudinal failure strain of wrapped specimens. The square wrapped specimens had lower compressive strength compared to the round specimens, even though the cross-sectional area of the square prisms was higher than that of the round cylinders. This is because of the reduced confinement provided by the wraps for square cross sections and stress concentrations that develop at the corners. Wrapped square prisms always failed by rupture of the wrap at a corner. A reduction of approximately 30 to 40% in failure stress was noted between wrapped specimens with round and square cross sections, respectively.

Comments

This is the authors' accepted manuscript of the article published in Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering. The version of record can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)MT.1943-5533.0001691#sthash.JA9OUibt.dpuf

DOI

10.1061/(ASCE)MT.1943-5533.0001691

Publisher Citation

Harichandran, R. S., Baiyasi, M. I., and Nossoni, G. (2016). “Freeze-thaw durability of concrete columns wrapped with FRP and subject to corrosion-like expansion.” Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, 29(1).

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