Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-2015

Subject: LCSH

Behavior therapy for teenagers, Psychotherapy

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess youth self-reported treatment barriers in the past 12 months to obtain youth’s perspective on reasons they seek treatment, do not engage in treatment, or terminate treatment. The present study uses data from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A), a nationally representative survey administered to youth ages 13–18 that was conducted between February 1, 2001 and January 30, 2004. A total of 10,123 youth participated in the NCS-A study and provided the information on which the current paper draws its data. Within the past 12 months over 63 % of youth reported seeking treatment to manage and cope with emotions. The greatest percentage of youth reported that they did not seek treatment because they wanted to handle the problem on their own (59.3 %). The greatest percentage of youth reported that treatment was terminated because they wanted to handle the problem on their own (57.5 %). Findings suggest professionals need to educate youth about the importance of professional treatment to increase engagement. If providers can motivate youth to see the value of treatment and help them understand that there can be positive outcomes, they may be less likely to terminate prematurely.

Comments

This is the author's peer-reviewed version of the article published in Community Mental Health Journal. The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10597-014-9776-x.

DOI

s10597-014-9776-x

Publisher Citation

Sylwestrzak, A., Overholt, C. E., Ristau, K. I., & Coker, K. L. (2015). Self-reported Barriers to Treatment Engagement: Adolescent Perspectives from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A). Community Mental Health Journal, 51(7), 775-781.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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