Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-27-2019

Subject: LCSH

Computer crimes—investigation, Virtual reality

Disciplines

Computer Engineering | Computer Sciences | Electrical and Computer Engineering | Forensic Science and Technology | Information Security

Abstract

This is one of the first accounts for the security analysis of consumer immersive Virtual Reality (VR) systems. This work breaks new ground, coins new terms, and constructs proof of concept implementations of attacks related to immersive VR. Our work used the two most widely adopted immersive VR systems, the HTC Vive, and the Oculus Rift. More specifically, we were able to create attacks that can potentially disorient users, turn their Head Mounted Display (HMD) camera on without their knowledge, overlay images in their field of vision, and modify VR environmental factors that force them into hitting physical objects and walls. Finally, we illustrate through a human participant deception study the success of being able to exploit VR systems to control immersed users and move them to a location in physical space without their knowledge. We term this the Human Joystick Attack. We conclude our work with future research directions and ways to enhance the security of these systems.

Comments

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1748950.

© © 2019 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works. The version of record may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TDSC.2019.2907942.

Dr. Baggili was appointed to the University of New Haven's Elder Family Endowed Chair in 2015.

DOI

10.1109/TDSC.2019.2907942

Publisher Citation

Casey, P., Baggili, I., & Yarramreddy, A. (2019). Immersive Virtual Reality Attacks and the Human Joystick. IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing. doi:10.1109/TDSC.2019.2907942

Available for download on Saturday, March 28, 2020

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