Author URLs

Dr. Baggili was appointed to the University of New Haven's Elder Family Endowed Chair in 2015.

This is the authors' version of the paper published in in ARES '19 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security by ACM. The paper of record is found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3339252.3340515.

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication Date

8-2019

Subject: LCSH

Computer crimes--investigation, Activity trackers (Wearable technology)

Disciplines

Computer Engineering | Computer Sciences | Electrical and Computer Engineering | Forensic Science and Technology | Information Security

Abstract

The ongoing popularity of health and fitness applications catalyzes

the need for exploring forensic artifacts produced by them. Sensitive

Personal Identifiable Information (PII) is requested by the applications

during account creation. Augmenting that with ongoing

user activities, such as the user’s walking paths, could potentially

create exculpatory or inculpatory digital evidence. We conducted

extensive manual analysis and explored forensic artifacts produced

by (n = 13) popular Android mobile health and fitness applications.

We also developed and implemented a tool that aided in the timely

acquisition and identification of artifacts from the examined applications.

Additionally, our work explored the type of data that

may be collected from health and fitness web platforms, and Web

Scraping mechanisms for data aggregation. The results clearly show

that numerous artifacts may be recoverable, and that the tested

web platforms pose serious privacy threats.

Comments

Dr. Baggili was appointed to the University of New Haven's Elder Family Endowed Chair in 2015.

This is the authors' version of the paper published in ARES '19 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security by ACM. ISBN: 978-1-4503-7164-3 The paper of record can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3339252.3340515

DOI

10.1145/3339252.3340515

Publisher Citation

Hassenfeldt, C., Baig, S., Baggili, I., & Zhang, X. (2019, August). Map My Murder: A Digital Forensic Study of Mobile Health and Fitness Applications. In Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security, ARES '19 (Article No. 42). ACM.

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