Title

Criminal Victimization Experienced While Studying Abroad: An Examination of Rates and Other Relevant Factors

Author URLs

Dr. Tamborra's, University of New Haven, Faculty Profile.

Dr. Baker's, University of New Haven, Faculty Profile.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-9-2019

Subject: LCSH

Foreign Study, Crime

Disciplines

Criminology and Criminal Justice | Psychology

Abstract

There are growing rates of U.S. college students studying abroad and existing literature reveals that college students experience moderate to high rates of certain types of crime; however, little is known about the victimization rates of college students while studying abroad. This is the first study known to use anonymous self-report data that examines the rates of various forms of victimization experienced while studying abroad. Findings from a sample of more than 1,000 undergraduate students studying on six continents revealed that victimization rates are low, with the exception of sexual harassment, unwanted touching, and theft. In addition, findings suggest that self-reported victimization rates vary depending upon the severity of the crime, respondents’ sex, and continent of study. These findings suggest the need for further research and additional programming; suggestions are put forth.

Comments

Full-text of this article is available to the University of New Haven community.

Article originally published in the "Journal of Studies in International Education," and available for purchase from Sage.

DOI

10.1177/1028315319861354

Publisher Citation

Tamborra, T. L., Baker, A. N., Jeffries, S., Tempio, M., & Campbell, E. (2019). Criminal Victimization Experienced While Studying Abroad: An Examination of Rates and Other Relevant Factors. Journal of Studies in International Education. https://doi.org/10.1177/1028315319861354

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